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Technology Products Cover A Wide Range

Technology-powered products that the book focuses on span a wide range, including:

  • Consumer-service products (e.g. Netflix, Airbnb, Etsy)
  • Social media (e.g. Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter)
  • Business services (e.g. Salesforce, Workday)
  • Consumer devices (e.g. Apple, Sonos, Tesla)
  • Mobile apps (e.g. Uber, Instagram)

The definition of "product" is very holistic, including not just features but the enabling technology, user experience design, monetization, customer acquisition, and offline experiences essential to delivering the product's value.

Section: 1, Chapter: 2

Book: Inspired

Author: Marty Cagan

Technology's Double-Edged Sword

Manson begins the chapter by recounting the incredible progress AI has made in recent years. He speculates about a potential future in which AI becomes so advanced that it starts to reshape every aspect of our lives.

Manson acknowledges the immense potential of AI to solve problems and improve the human condition. But there's a darker side to this sci-fi speculation. Manson imagines a world in which most forms of human labor and cognition have been made obsolete by machines, which could lead to a kind of nihilistic ennui, a loss of purpose and meaning.

Moreover, if we create artificial minds vastly smarter than ourselves, how can we be sure they will share our values and goals?

Ultimately, he argues, the AI revolution will force us to confront the most fundamental questions of the human condition with renewed urgency. What makes life meaningful? What is the nature of consciousness? Should we embrace our own obsolescence for the greater cosmic good?

Section: 2, Chapter: 9

Book: Everything is F*cked

Author: Mark Manson

China's Chip Ambitions Threaten US Technological Leadership

China's aggressive push for self-sufficiency in semiconductors has sparked concern among US chip industry leaders. The country's massive subsidies and state-backed efforts to acquire technology threaten to erode America's competitive edge. This concern is heightened by the fact that many US chip companies heavily rely on the Chinese market, creating a complex dynamic where their biggest customer is also their biggest competitor.

Section: 7, Chapter: 49

Book: Chip War

Author: Chris Miller

The "Inconvenient Truth" About Electric Cars

Many people view electric vehicles (EVs) as the answer to reducing transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions. However, EVs have significant limitations and unintended consequences:

  • In most states, the majority of electricity is still generated from coal-fired power plants. In some cases, coal is nearly twice as carbon-intensive as gasoline per unit of energy.
  • The reduced cost-per-mile of electricity vs. gasoline creates a powerful incentive to drive more. This "rebound effect" negates efficiency gains.
  • Emissions from producing and maintaining roads, vehicles and other infrastructure add another 50% on top of tailpipe emissions.
  • Even with better fuel efficiency, transportation will remain the largest and fastest-growing energy sector.

Section: 1, Chapter: 3

Book: Walkable City

Author: Jeff Speck

The Gender Data Gap in Smartphone Design

Smartphones are getting ever larger, with the average screen size ballooning from 3.2 inches in 2010 to over 5.5 inches today. The average woman's hand is an inch smaller in width than the average man's, so large phones are harder for women to hold and use comfortably.

Women's pockets are on average 48% shorter and 6.5% narrower than men's, so large phones don't fit well in women's pockets, making them easier to drop and break. Women are more likely to suffer from repetitive strain injuries in their hands and wrists, which can be exacerbated by overextending to reach all parts of a large screen

Some features like facial recognition work less well for women, as the algorithms are often trained on mostly male faces
Despite being half the smartphone market, women's needs are rarely centred in phone design.

Section: 3, Chapter: 8

Book: Invisible Women

Author: Caroline Criado Perez

AI Is Fundamentally A Prediction Technology

The authors argue that the essence of recent advances in AI is that they represent a dramatic improvement in prediction - the ability to take information you have and generate information you don't have. Prediction is a key input into decision making. As prediction becomes cheaper, we will use more of it and the value of other inputs to decision making like human prediction will fall while the value of complements like data and judgment will rise. Judgment is determining the relative payoff or reward to different actions - it is a statement of what we want, while prediction tells us the likelihood of different outcomes.

Section: 1, Chapter: 3

Book: Power and Prediction

Author: Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, Avi Goldfarb

AI Navigation Apps Could Disrupt The Economics Of Airport Retail

Airport operators should be wary of the disruptive potential of AI-powered navigation apps like Waze and Google Maps. Key considerations:

  • These apps can provide increasingly accurate, personalized predictions of travel time to the airport, reducing the need for passengers to budget large uncertainty buffers
  • As passengers become more confident in "just in time" airport arrival, demand for in-terminal retail and dining may fall significantly
  • Airport operators should explore ways to actively partner with navigation apps to shape behavior and preserve retail revenues, rather than being passive victims of disruption

Section: 2, Chapter: 5

Book: Power and Prediction

Author: Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, Avi Goldfarb

"Real Men Have Fabs"

The chip industry's landscape has undergone significant changes, moving away from the traditional model of integrated design and manufacturing within a single company. Foundries like TSMC have emerged, offering chip fabrication services to fabless companies that focus solely on design. This shift is driven by the increasing cost and complexity of building and operating fabs, as each generation of technological advancement requires more expensive equipment and expertise.

However, some industry veterans like Jerry Sanders, founder of AMD, remain staunch advocates of the integrated model, believing that owning fabs is essential for maintaining control and ensuring quality. He famously quipped, "Real men have fabs," reflecting a cultural attachment to the traditional way of doing things. However, the economic realities and the success of fabless companies are challenging this mindset.

Section: 6, Chapter: 35

Book: Chip War

Author: Chris Miller

The Dark Side of the Sociometer

One reason social media is so compelling to teen girls is that it taps into their "sociometer" - an internal gauge of social value and status. The sociometer tracks:

  • Appearance: How pretty/thin am I compared to other girls?
  • Popularity: How many friends/likes/comments do I have?
  • Reputation: What are people saying about me? Any negative gossip?
    While girls have always been attuned to social comparison, social media has put the sociometer on steroids:

Quantified metrics mean popularity is always being ranked, whilst selfies and filters make everyone look unrealistically flawless. Performative posting means constant curation of your image For girls prone to insecurity, social media is like holding up a magnifying mirror to every flaw and fear. Many end up depressed and anxious from the 24/7 sociometer assault.

Section: 1, Chapter: 6

Book: The Anxious Generation

Author: Jonathan Haidt

How Male-Biased Algorithms Perpetuate Inequality

The algorithms increasingly used to make hiring, lending and admissions decisions are not as objective as they seem:

  • Hiring algorithms trained on past hiring data conclude that successful candidates look like current employees - replicating the historic male skew
  • Algorithms used to predict recidivism in the criminal justice system rate Black defendants as higher-risk than white defendants, reflecting racial bias in policing data
  • Credit-scoring algorithms give women lower credit limits and higher interest rates than men, as they are trained on data reflecting the gender pay gap
  • College admissions algorithms favor students from wealthy, white, male-dominated schools, as they are trained on data that encodes systemic privilege

Section: 3, Chapter: 9

Book: Invisible Women

Author: Caroline Criado Perez

"How Could Google And Facebook Know About My Affair???"

Imagine this scenario: a married woman starts an affair with a coworker. She is careful not to leave any obvious traces, but the signs are there if you know how to look:

  • Location tracking on her phone shows frequent visits to hotels near the office
  • Her search history includes "how to hide an affair" and "signs your partner is cheating"
  • Her social media posts depict a happy marriage, but facial recognition AI detects micro-expressions of doubt and unease

Thanks to the power of big data and machine learning, companies like Google and Facebook can connect the dots to infer even our most intimate secrets - often without us realizing it.

This example illustrates a stark reality: in the digital age, privacy is becoming a relic of the past. No matter how carefully we curate our online image, the truth leaks out in a thousand data points we scatter in our wake.

Section: 3, Chapter: 8

Book: Homo Deus

Author: Yuval Noah Harari

Enter the Vacuum Tube: A Glowing Innovation with Glitches

The invention of the vacuum tube marked a significant step forward in computing. By using electrical charges that could be switched on and off, vacuum tubes could represent 1s and 0s, the foundation of binary code. Unlike mechanical gears, vacuum tubes could be reprogrammed, allowing for greater flexibility in calculations. However, the limitations of vacuum tubes, including their size, unreliability, and attraction to moths, made it clear that a more efficient switch was needed.

Section: 1, Chapter: 1

Book: Chip War

Author: Chris Miller

Strategies to Close the Gender Gap in Tech

To create a more inclusive tech industry and unbiased algorithms, we need:

  • Active recruitment and retention of women in STEM education and careers
  • Unconscious bias training for educators, managers and HR professionals to combat sexist stereotyping
  • Blind resume screening and structured interviews to reduce bias in hiring
  • Transparent and equitable compensation structures to close the gender pay gap
  • Clear anti-harassment policies and reporting mechanisms to create safe work environments
  • Flexible work arrangements and family-friendly policies to support work-life balance
  • Intentional collection and use of diverse, representative datasets to train unbiased AI
  • Algorithmic audits and impact assessments to identify and correct for bias in AI systems
  • Inclusive user research and testing to design products that work for diverse users
  • Diverse leadership and governance to ensure accountability and align AI with societal values

Section: 3, Chapter: 9

Book: Invisible Women

Author: Caroline Criado Perez

Delay Smartphones Until 14 or Later

Smartphones are developmentally inappropriate for most middle schoolers. Compared to teens who get phones later, those who get them earlier show:

  • Poorer grades and test scores
  • Less reading and more mediocre content consumption
  • More social comparison, body image issues, and FOMO
  • Earlier/riskier sexual activity and porn exposure
  • Higher rates of anxiety, depression, self-harm

Push smartphones and social media until at least the start of high school. There's no evidence earlier access improves wellbeing. Give younger kids a basic phone for emergencies only.

Section: 4, Chapter: 12

Book: The Anxious Generation

Author: Jonathan Haidt

Humans And Computers Are Complements

Many people worry that computers will put people out of work. But in reality, technology is improving productivity and helping people do higher-leverage work. In many fields, the most valuable companies are those that combine the strengths of computers and humans:

  • Palantir uses AI to flag suspicious activity but has human analysts make judgment calls
  • LinkedIn uses automated data aggregation but human curation and editing
  • Hybrid human-computer solutions are underrated relative to complete automation

Instead of trying to replace people entirely, the most valuable companies will ask "How can computers help humans solve hard problems?"

Section: 1, Chapter: 12

Book: Zero to One

Author: Peter Thiel

The Productivity Paradox And The Lag Between Technology And Productivity

The history of technology adoption is full of examples where the expected productivity benefits of a major innovation were slow to materialize - a phenomenon termed the "productivity paradox." In the 1970s and 1980s, for example, businesses made huge investments in computers and information technology. But productivity growth actually slowed during this period, puzzling economists.

It took a long time for businesses to figure out how to reorganize their processes and train their workforces to take full advantage of computers.

We're seeing a version of this story play out with Big Data and AI today. Despite the hype about these technologies revolutionizing every industry, hard productivity numbers have yet to catch up with the promised potential. That doesn't mean the revolution won't happen - just that it will likely take longer than expected as businesses gradually learn how to fully harness the power of these innovations.

Section: 1, Chapter: 1

Book: The Signal and the Noise

Author: Nate Silver

The Dataist Creed

Even as humanism faces existential threats from AI, a new ideology is emerging that may come to dominate our century - Dataism. Its central tenets are:

  1. Data is the supreme value - the world consists of data flows, and the value of any phenomenon lies in its contribution to data processing. From this perspective: An organism is simply an algorithm and its value lies in processing data; A society is a system for harvesting and analyzing data.
  2. Humans are no longer the most important data processors - the baton is passing to computers, which are far better at crunching information than biological brains. As AI advances, algorithms will know us better than we know ourselves, making human decision-making obsolete. Humans will merge with technology to stay relevant, blurring the line between organic and artificial intelligence
  3. Bringing more and more data online is the supreme good - information wants to be free. All barriers to the flow of data should be removed. Privacy is theft from the data commons, free speech and transparency are sacred, and expanding the internet of things is a moral imperative

Section: 3, Chapter: 11

Book: Homo Deus

Author: Yuval Noah Harari

AI Adoption Faces The Same Challenges As Past General Purpose Technologies

The authors argue that AI is a general purpose technology (GPT) like electricity and the steam engine that has the potential to transform the economy over time. However, as with past GPTs, there is a significant delay between the initial invention and demonstration of the technology and its widespread adoption and impact on productivity. The authors refer to this delay as "The Between Times." During this period, point solutions and application solutions emerge, but the big productivity gains come only later with the development of system solutions that more fully exploit the technology's potential.

Section: 1, Chapter: 2

Book: Power and Prediction

Author: Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, Avi Goldfarb

Andy Grove - The Architect Behind OKRs

Andy Grove, Intel's pioneering CEO, was the main architect behind OKRs. Grove wanted to create an environment at Intel that valued and emphasized output rather than activities.

He sought to create a system where managers didn't have to tell people what to do through command-and-control. Rather, he aimed to create a culture of discipline and self-management where there was clarity on objectives and people could determine the best approach themselves.

Grove eschewed traditional, private goal-setting in favor of transparent OKRs where everyone's goals, from the CEO down, were openly shared. Objectives were significant, concrete and action-oriented. Key results were measurable and verifiable milestones for achieving the objective.

Section: 1, Chapter: 2

Book: Measure What Matters

Author: John Doerr

The Petrie Multiplier Effect for Women in Tech

In the early days of computing, women were well-represented as programmers. But as the prestige and pay of the field grew, women were actively pushed out:

  • In the 1960s-70s, personality tests and hiring criteria were introduced that favored stereotypically male traits, like introversion and a singular focus on machines over people
  • These criteria were not proven to be predictive of programming ability, but they shaped a stereotype of "anti-social nerds" as the archetypal coder that persists today
  • Women who remained in the field faced rampant sexism and doubts of their competence, leading many to leave over time

Today, women make up only 25% of computing jobs. This gender gap stems not from innate differences, but from biased assumptions about what makes someone good at the work.

Section: 2, Chapter: 5

Book: Invisible Women

Author: Caroline Criado Perez

"AIs Are Idiot Savants, Not General Intelligence"

"Predicting on the support of your data is not as simple as collecting data from a wider variety of settings to ensure you aren't extrapolating too much or avoiding predicting too far into the future. Sometimes the data you need doesn't exist. This underlies the refrain repeated in every statistics course worldwide: correlation is not necessarily causation."

Section: 1, Chapter: 3

Book: Power and Prediction

Author: Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, Avi Goldfarb

The Advantages of the Fabless Model

The success of fabless companies like Nvidia and Qualcomm highlights the advantages of specializing in chip design and outsourcing manufacturing. This approach allows companies to:

Reduce Capital Expenditure: Avoid the massive costs associated with building and maintaining fabs.

Focus on Core Competencies: Concentrate resources on design and innovation rather than manufacturing intricacies.

Access Cutting-edge Technology: Leverage the expertise and advanced processes of leading foundries.

Increase Flexibility and Agility: Respond quickly to market demands and technological advancements.

Section: 6, Chapter: 36

Book: Chip War

Author: Chris Miller

Jack Kilby and the Integrated Circuit:

Jack Kilby, an engineer at Texas Instruments, focused on simplifying the complexity of wiring multiple transistors together. In 1958, he developed the concept of the "integrated circuit," where multiple transistors could be built on a single piece of semiconductor material, eliminating the need for extensive wiring. This invention, later known as the "chip," marked a significant breakthrough in miniaturization and efficiency.

Section: 1, Chapter: 3

Book: Chip War

Author: Chris Miller

The Rise of Fabless Chip Design

The emergence of fabless chip design firms has been a transformative force in the semiconductor industry. These companies focus on chip design and outsource manufacturing to foundries, allowing them to avoid the enormous capital expenditures associated with building and operating fabs. This model has lowered entry barriers and enabled a new wave of innovation, with startups pioneering specialized chip designs for various applications.

One notable example is Nvidia, a leading designer of graphics processing units (GPUs) that have become essential for computer graphics, gaming, and artificial intelligence. Nvidia's success demonstrates the viability of the fabless model, enabling the company to focus on its core competency of chip design and leverage the manufacturing expertise of foundries like TSMC.

Section: 6, Chapter: 36

Book: Chip War

Author: Chris Miller

Huawei's Rise: A Strategic Challenge

Huawei, a Chinese telecom giant, has emerged as a major player in the global tech industry, offering advanced telecom equipment, smartphones, and other tech infrastructure. The company's success, built on a combination of R&D investment, efficient manufacturing, and government support, has raised concerns in the U.S. and other countries, as it is seen as a strategic challenge to American technological leadership and a potential security risk.

Section: 7, Chapter: 46

Book: Chip War

Author: Chris Miller

The Traitorous Eight

With the invention of the transistor, the challenge shifted to manufacturing them reliably and at scale. William Shockley, driven by ambition and a desire for wealth, established Shockley Semiconductor in California. However, his poor management skills and toxic work environment led to the departure of eight talented engineers - The Traitorous Eight - who would go on to found Fairchild Semiconductor and play a pivotal role in the development of Silicon Valley.

Section: 1, Chapter: 3

Book: Chip War

Author: Chris Miller

Taiwan's Strategic Shift: From Assembly to Innovation

The 1990s marked a turning point for Taiwan's role in the semiconductor industry. Recognizing the limitations of being primarily an assembly hub, Taiwan's leaders, particularly K.T. Li, sought to move towards higher-value chip fabrication. This strategic shift was driven by several factors, including the need to stay ahead of China's growing manufacturing capabilities and the desire to capture a larger share of the industry's profits. The establishment of TSMC, spearheaded by Morris Chang, was central to this vision. TSMC's innovative foundry model, which focused solely on manufacturing chips designed by other companies, revolutionized the industry and propelled Taiwan to the forefront of advanced chip production.

Section: 5, Chapter: 29

Book: Chip War

Author: Chris Miller

The Parable Of Three Entrepreneurs

The authors use the historical example of the slow adoption of electricity to illustrate the challenges of deploying a new general purpose technology like AI. They describe three types of entrepreneurs that tried to exploit electricity in different ways in the late 19th/early 20th century:

  • Point solution entrepreneurs who simply replaced steam power with electric power with minimal factory redesign. This provided limited benefits.
  • Application solution entrepreneurs who redesigned individual machines and tools around electric motors. This enabled some new capabilities but still limited benefits without factory redesign.
  • System solution entrepreneurs who completely redesigned factories to fully exploit the unique advantages of electric power. This is what ultimately transformed manufacturing and the economy, but it took decades.

Section: 1, Chapter: 1

Book: Power and Prediction

Author: Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, Avi Goldfarb

EUV's Importance and Development

By the late 2010s, ASML had spent nearly two decades perfecting extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUV). EUV was crucial for the continuation of Moore's Law, which predicted the exponential growth in the number of transistors on a chip. Existing lithography methods using deep ultraviolet light were reaching their limit and couldn't produce the even smaller circuits needed for next-generation semiconductors. EUV, with a much smaller wavelength, was the only viable path forward. The development of EUV was an incredibly complex engineering feat requiring collaboration from companies around the world to source the most advanced components, purest metals, and most powerful lasers.

Implementing EUV lithography presented several challenges that pushed the limits of engineering. Creating an EUV light source required blasting tiny tin droplets with a laser fifty thousand times per second. This process generated immense heat and required a specialized laser system that took a decade to develop. Additionally, EUV light is difficult to reflect, necessitating the creation of the smoothest mirrors ever made, constructed from alternating layers of molybdenum and silicon, each just a couple of nanometers thick.

Section: 6, Chapter: 39

Book: Chip War

Author: Chris Miller

The End of Remembering in the Age of Technology

Today we live in a world of ubiquitous external memory. Books, recordings, photographs, and digital databases have made memorization effectively obsolete for most practical purposes. With smartphones and the internet, we have instant access to more information than the greatest scholars of antiquity could ever dream of. But Foer argues this comes at a cost. By outsourcing our memories to external devices, we risk diminishing our own capacity to think and engage with knowledge. We become ever more dependent on our machines, passive consumers of information rather than active rememberers and thinkers.

The solution, Foer believes, is to cultivate memory as an act of intellectual resistance in an age of forgetfulness. Even if the art of memory isn't strictly necessary today, practicing it develops our capacity for concentration, creative thinking, and deep engagement with knowledge. It keeps us cognitively fit and independent even as technology promises to do our thinking for us.

Section: 1, Chapter: 7

Book: Moonwalking with Einstein

Author: Joshua Foer

The Dot-Com Crash Taught Misguided Lessons

The dot-com crash in the early 2000s taught Silicon Valley four main lessons:

  • Make incremental advances
  • Stay lean and flexible
  • Improve on the competition
  • Focus on product, not sales

However, the opposite principles are probably more correct:

  • It's better to risk boldness than triviality
  • A bad plan is better than no plan
  • Competitive markets destroy profits
  • Sales matters just as much as product

The need for new technology is greater now than ever before. But we won't get it if everyone focuses on incremental improvements.

Section: 1, Chapter: 2

Book: Zero to One

Author: Peter Thiel

Could A New Social Technology Save Us From Runaway Mimetic Desire?

History has seen two major social "technologies" that helped control negative mimesis:

  1. The scapegoat mechanism, which channeled violent rivalries into the sacrifice of a single victim. It temporarily unites communities against a common enemy.
  2. The market economy, which transforms many rivalries into economic competition. Adversaries fight for market share, not to the death.

As both these systems weaken, a "third invention" may be needed - some new social mechanism to contain mimetic violence. Possibilities include:

  • Gamified marketplaces that reward pro-social behavior
  • Massive online communities organized by self-transcending values
  • A resurgence of ritual and religion in shared physical spaces

Section: 1, Chapter: 8

Book: Wanting

Author: Luke Burgis

Rule #3 - Quit Social Media

The author argues that the use of social media tools should be avoided for most knowledge workers. While these tools fragment attention and reduce the ability to concentrate, their perceived benefits are typically not much more than minor distractions. The any-benefit approach to network tool selection, where any potential positive is used to justify its use, is flawed. Instead, the craftsman approach should be used, which asks to adopt a tool only if its positive impacts substantially outweigh its negative impacts.

Section: 2, Chapter: 3

Book: Deep Work

Author: Cal Newport

Books about Technology

Technology

History

Economics

Chip War Book Summary

Chris Miller

This book unveils the hidden battle for control of microchip technology, a struggle that will define the future of the global economy and the balance of power between the US and China.

Chip War Book Summary

Psychology

Entrepreneurship

Technology

Hooked Book Summary

Nir Eyal

Hooked provides a practical framework for designing habit-forming products that solve users' problems and improve their lives, while cautioning against the ethical risks of misapplying persuasive technology.

Hooked Book Summary

Business

Management

Technology

Crossing the Chasm Book Summary

Geoffrey Moore

"Crossing the Chasm" unveils the hidden challenges of launching disruptive technologies and provides a proven roadmap for navigating the treacherous gap between early adopters and mainstream markets, enabling companies to achieve market leadership and sustainable growth.

Crossing the Chasm Book Summary

Entrepreneurship

Business

Management

Technology

Zero to One Book Summary

Peter Thiel

Zero to One is a contrarian and insightful guide to creating the future through building innovative companies that escape competition and push technology forward.

Zero to One Book Summary

Futurism

Technology

Humanity

Society

Homo Deus Book Summary

Yuval Noah Harari

Homo Deus explores the future of humanity in a world where the old challenges of famine, plague, and war have been largely conquered, and new godlike technologies of artificial intelligence and bioengineering are on the horizon, forcing us to confront fundamental questions about the nature of consciousness, free will, and what it means to be human in an age of algorithms.

Homo Deus Book Summary

History

Innovation

Science

Where Good Ideas Come From Book Summary

Steven Johnson

Steven Johnson argues that breakthrough innovations arise from connected environments that enable the serendipitous collision of slow hunches, happy accidents, and novel combinations of existing ideas, rather than isolated eureka moments of lone genius.

Where Good Ideas Come From Book Summary

Business

Technology

Management

Inspired Book Summary

Marty Cagan

"Inspired" reveals the essential mindsets, principles and techniques used by leading tech companies to create products that customers love.

Inspired Book Summary

Futurism

Artificial Intelligence

Technology

Computer Science

Power And Prediction Book Summary

Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, Avi Goldfarb

"Power and Prediction" argues that the true potential of AI lies not in automating individual tasks, but in enabling the redesign of entire systems and decision-making processes, which will lead to significant shifts in economic and political power as AI evolves from a tool for prediction into a catalyst for transformation.

Power And Prediction Book Summary

Management

Entrepreneurship

Business

Product Management

Hacking Growth Book Summary

Sean Ellis

Hacking Growth reveals the revolutionary growth hacking techniques used by today's fastest-growing companies to drive breakout success - and shows you exactly how to implement them in your own organization.

Hacking Growth Book Summary

Artificial Intelligence

Computer Science

Futurism

The Alignment Problem Book Summary

Brian Christian

The Alignment Problem explores the challenge of ensuring that as artificial intelligence systems grow more sophisticated, they reliably do what we want them to do - and argues that solving this "AI alignment problem" is crucial not only for beneficial AI, but for understanding intelligence and agency more broadly.

The Alignment Problem Book Summary
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